[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text][easy-social-share buttons=”facebook,twitter,pinterest,linkedin,print,mail” counters=0 style=”button”][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”10px”][vc_column_text]According to a research study conducted in the U.K., successful girls who flourished as adults had these things in common: very high expectations and a constant reminder of those expectations.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”The University Of Essex Studied 15,000 British Schoolgirls
” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:30|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Open%20Sans%3A300%2C300italic%2Cregular%2Citalic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic%2C800%2C800italic|font_style:300%20light%20regular%3A300%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1477334431303{padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][vc_single_image image=”13373″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]They were aged 13-14 and were studied over a 10 year period. In all of the girls surveyed, their primary parent (usually the mother) displayed high parental expectations. The researchers found these girls were:

 

  • Less likely to get pregnant
  • Less likely to be unemployed
  • Less likely to work in dead-end jobs
  • More likely to attend college

 

[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”custom” el_width=”70″ accent_color=”#962468″ css=”.vc_custom_1468283466004{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Don’t Look For A Thank You … Just Yet
” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:30|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Open%20Sans%3A300%2C300italic%2Cregular%2Citalic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic%2C800%2C800italic|font_style:300%20light%20regular%3A300%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1477334520460{padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][vc_single_image image=”13376″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]Anyone who has parented a 13-14 year-old girl (or boy for that matter) gets used to their responses quickly. Door slams, grouchiness and eye rolls are just a few of the more obvious reactions. But, the research showed that while consciously our kids may find us annoying, deep down they may be listening.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”custom” el_width=”70″ accent_color=”#962468″ css=”.vc_custom_1468283466004{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Does Nagging Really Work?
” font_container=”tag:h2|font_size:30|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Open%20Sans%3A300%2C300italic%2Cregular%2Citalic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic%2C800%2C800italic|font_style:300%20light%20regular%3A300%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1477334578692{padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][vc_single_image image=”13374″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]Nagging seemed to work in this study of young teenage girls. (That’s not to say it won’t work for boys too.) Think about it. Do you still hear the voice of your parents warning you about excesses and expectations?[/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”custom” el_width=”70″ accent_color=”#962468″ css=”.vc_custom_1468283466004{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text][easy-social-share buttons=”facebook,twitter,pinterest,linkedin,print,mail” counters=0 style=”button”][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]